Extreme Low Tide at Pine Gully Park


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On Sunday we made a trek to southeast Houston to Maas Plant Nursery in Seabrook. Unfortunately the trip was a bust, a lot of plants weren’t out quite yet for spring and their native plant selection was lower than it has been in years past. We’d promised Forest a trip to a playground and just down the street is Pine Gully Park, a park I’ve seen for years during our trips to this plant nursery. We opted to poke into the park and see what it looked like and luckily enough there was a playground to go with the hiking trail that I had seen. But before either of those, we were all enamored with the fact that the cold front that had blazed through with strong winds the previous day had pushed out the water in the bay several hundred yards. This meant fun exploration for the three of us and the many groups of people up scattered up and down the beach. A quick search of this park online shows that the water is indeed usually up near the rocks that reinforce the shoreline. I had hoped there’d be a few more interesting tidbits that the low water would reveal, but only a few shrimp and jellies that didn’t escape as the water was swept out were what we primarily found, though Chris did spot this live shark’s eye, Neverita duplicata near the waterline.

Afterwards, Forest played at the playground and we watched as a tanker left the Houston Ship Channel heading for the open bay and beyond Bolivar Roads, the Gulf of Mexico. It was a gorgeous day to be out on the bay and if we would have had lunch with us we would have stayed even longer. It made me miss the water and wish I had more time to sit and stare at the ocean.

*I mentally waved at you Linda as we passed Shoreacres!*

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3 thoughts on “Extreme Low Tide at Pine Gully Park

  1. Sarah says:

    This is wild! Yes, 100% the water is usually up by the rocks.

  2. Judy Bass says:

    We haven’t made our winter trip to the beach. Maybe after this next cold front.

  3. shoreacres says:

    Here I am, waving right back! Those are great photos. I’ve seen the other side of that coin, too — when strong southerlies or an approaching storm leave Todville Road covered with water and the park closed because of flooding! Years ago, I once saw Clear Lake itself so emptied of water that only the channels that had been dredged through it still held water. On the Outdoors Show I listen to on 610AM, the guys were talking this morning about the year you could walk across Trinity Bay. Winter in Texas!

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