BlogHer
Flickr
Really Old Archives
Ravelry
@owilderness
Sprout Dispatch
YouTube







Follow on Bloglovin

Read OW in your inbox!:

Delivered by FeedBurner



Contests & Other Items
Creative
Food
Family & Friends
Gardening
Journeys
Local Adventures
Local Coffee
Memes
Nature In The City
Outdoors
Thoughts

+Selected Posts+

Thru-Hiking the Florida Trail How-To
Little Lake Creek Loop, SHNF
Our Work in Print
Thru-Hiker Deliciousness
The Greatest Mountain


A Florida Journal
Backyard Ramblings
Do What You Love
Elizabeth
Florida Native Orchids
Ginger Blue
Kal Barteski
Life Less Ordinary
Longest Acres
Messy Canvas
State of Wilderness
The Art of Life
The Familiar Wilderness
Wolfie and the Sneak


<

IMG_8097

IMG_8098
Old logging scars…what a shame, they cut the tree down but couldn’t haul it out.

IMG_8099

IMG_8100

IMG_8101

IMG_8102

IMG_8103

IMG_8104

IMG_8105

IMG_8106

IMG_8108

IMG_8110

IMG_8114

IMG_8117

IMG_8121

IMG_8123

IMG_8124

On our second day of swamp walking in Fakahatchee Strand we went to a completely different section of the central slough, coming in from Janes Scenic Drive, the main dirt road that winds up through the park. This would be a bushwhacking adventure instead of the easy walk like the previous day. We also did not end up hiking with Mike this day as he had a group of other volunteers and was leaving from a little bit further down the road than we were. Theorhetically our destinations were the same, a large and deep pond about a mile north of the road, but in the end it was only our group that ended up getting up to that pond.

First off we walked through brush and vegetation that wasn’t too terrible, reaching the first pond and circumnavigating it quickly. Not finding anything out of the ordinary we moved on maybe a hundred yards to the east-northeast to another pond. It was there we found a few orchids and the interesting scars on the downed tree that had been nearly hauled out of the swamp half a century or more ago. After visiting this pond it was then that we found thicker brush and spent a good deal of time bushwhacking to get up to the largest pond about a half a mile north. A half mile doesn’t sound horrible, but when you aren’t necessarily walking in a straight line and have to slow down for briars and vines, well, it can take a lot longer than one might imagine.

The large pond was fantastic and worth the work to get to it. It seemed to go on and on and I know that I didn’t see the breadth of the area. Chris had an encounter with an alligator on one side of the pond, but I attempted to stay no deeper than my knees, though on occassion I ended up thigh deep due to necessity. Being out there in the swamp, a mile from the road, it is a unique feeling. A mile from a road in any typical wilderness doesn’t sound very far, but in Fakahatchee it is a place that very few people ever get to see.

Our hike out didn’t take the same path and Chris and I separated from the others we’d hiked in with. Using our GPS we hiked generally in a south direction, only changing a couple of times to head east in an attempt to find a tram to parallel. The trams are generally overgrown and unpassable, though sometimes you can walk in the ditches that are directly adjacent to them. We had a short scare while crossing over one of the trams when a branch flipped back into Chris’ eye. He had me look in his eye but I saw nothing, thinking maybe he scratched it instead. He doused water in his eye and managed to get a small piece of a twig out! That had to have been quite painful!

Moving onward we began really bushwhacking our way out, moving slowly as we ducked under tree limbs, climbed over tree limbs, and attempted to avoid the poison ivy and Smilax vines, mostly to no avail. Eventually we found our way out to Janes Scenic Drive much farther east than we’d entered the swamp. To our west we saw a group of people, thinking it was the guys we’d hiked in with. Instead it was Mike and the crew he’d gone into the swamp! We’d really hiked further east than we’d intended!

We stood around and chatted with the folks we hadn’t met before and Chris caught up with a few people he knew from previous years of swamp hiking. Eventually we made it back to the truck we’d came to the swamp in and then headed back to the cabin we were all staying in or camping at. The last few photos are from the cabin. The cabin owners graciously let the park use the cabin a few times a year for various events. The park has several areas of inholdings and the cabin is one of them. It’s about two miles down a tram from Janes Scenic road and is probably one of the more popular hiking/biking trams there is in the park. A plethora of alligators hang out in the pond behind the cabin.

Chris went out again the next morning but I was done swamping so I opted do some other exploring closer to the cabin and up on Janes Scenic Drive instead. More on that in another post…

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Facebook Twitter Email

One Comment

  1. Patrice says:

    I’m just not sure I could ever feel comfortable hiking in a swamp with alligators …

Leave a Reply

`

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

`





















LINKwithlove


Nature Blog
 Network

  • July 2014
  • June 2014
  • May 2014
  • April 2014
  • March 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • June 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • May 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • August 2011
  • July 2011
  • June 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • February 2011
  • January 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009