Watson Native Plant Preserve | Part I


Posts from 2011: Part I, Part II, and Part III—I’ve noticed a few mis-identifications on those old posts and need to go back and fix them.

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Small-Flower Pawpaw, Asimina parviflora
We arrived to Watson Preserve mid-morning before the heat started setting in. And honestly, as I’m writing this two weeks later, it is much hotter and more humid now than it was then. Someone pulled in not long after we arrived, an older couple, who asked if we’d visited before. They didn’t stay long and I don’t even know that they saw the back part of the preserve with the bog!

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We started off on the boardwalk that eventually winds itself down to parallel with Lake Hyatt. My Texas plant knowledge is far better than the first time I came here in 2011 so I recognized far more plants than I did back then, but looking back at my previous posts I gave it a good try!

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Jack-in-the-pulpits cascading over the boardwalk.

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A rhododendron I believe but I’m not sure…

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Round-leaved Boneset, Eupatorium rotundifolium
Of course there were plenty of plants I didn’t recognize because I just spend so little time over in this part of Texas.

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Red Milkweed, Asclepias rubra

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Tuberous Grasspink, Calopogon tuberosus
The grasspink orchids were blooming all over the place. Almost anywhere you turned you could find one blooming.

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Pale Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia alata

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Yellow Meadowbeauty, Rhexia lutea
I don’t remember this plant from last time and I had never seen one before (that I recall) but I am in love! Now I want to find seeds or some in the nursery trade (fat chance!) to add to the garden. They are so lovely!

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Pineland Hibiscus, Hibiscus aculeatus — I wish these had been in bloom!

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Pencil Flower, Stylosanthes biflora

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Sanguine Purple Coneflower, Echinacea sanguinea

I’ll leave the post with these lovely coneflowers which were planted adjacent to Geraldine’s house. Part II coming soon!

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3 thoughts on “Watson Native Plant Preserve | Part I

  1. shoreacres says:

    I was there just yesterday, and it was interesting to compare your post with what I saw. The yellow meadow-beauty was nearly gone. I was able to photograph a few flowers, but there weren’t many. And I didn’t see any of the pale coneflower. On the other hand, the red milkweed was in bloom everywhere.

    Best of all were the snowy orchids. I hadn’t heard that they were in bloom — it was pure happenstance that I found them. I have a photo on Lagniappe today. I’ll post more, but gosh — I just had to share one right away!

  2. shoreacres says:

    ps: I didn’t mention where I found them, just in case….

  3. Your plant identification skills have ALWAYS been impressive. And I am always amazed at all the different wildflowers Texas shows off.

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